People, groups, and organizations

  • Shirokanedai workshop, hosted by Dr. Masahiko Ono, is held twice a year at Meiji Gakuin University in Tokyo. The aim of the workshop is to share knowledge about effective intervention for school attendance problems. The workshop is open to people with an interest in school attendance problems. School teachers, the parents of school-refusing youth, politicians, lawyers, and university students have participated in the workshop. In the workshop, participants present case studies of intervention for school attendance problems. To find out more about the workshop please contact the chair of the workshop, Dr. Masahiko Ono: onom@psy.meijigakuin.ac.jp (Language: Japanese)
  • The Workshop for Supporting Youths to Return to School (Hina no kai) is held three or four times a year in Fukuyama City, Hiroshima. The key aim is to share knowledge of a school-based team approach to school-refusing youth. The group is open to all school teachers and parents with an interest in school refusal. The meeting focuses on a practical approach for school return, and participants present and discuss case studies. To find out more about the workshop program please contact LIB Psychoeducation Research Institution in Fukuyama City, Hiroshima (Dr. Kuniko Sakurai). http://libshinri.sunnyday.jp/hina_gakushu.html (Language: Japanese)
  • The workshop for school refusal and Hikikomori (Japanese social withdrawal), hosted by Dr. Junichi Sonoda, is held once a year in Kagoshima City. The main aim of the workshop is to share and create knowledge about addressing school refusal and Hikikomori from the viewpoint of the behavioural approach. The workshop is open to people with interest in school refusal and Hikikomori. After the workshop, some participants can receive an individual counselling with experienced psychotherapists sent from an incorporated non-profit organization. To find more about the information of the workshop, please contact Authorized NPO Ami in Kagoshima City.  https://npo-ami.com (Language: Japanese)   

Current and upcoming activities and achievements

  • On December 12th and 26th a workshop for school teachers working at Japanese compulsory schools will take place in Fukuyama City, Hiroshima. The workshops are hosted by LIB Psychoeducation Research Institution. The aims of the workshop are to understand a variety of youths’ problems and seek solutions. To find out more about the workshop, please contact LIB Psychoeducation Research Institution (Dr. Kuniko Sakurai). http://libshinri.sunnyday.jp/hina_gakushu.html (Language: Japanese)
  • The youth support consultation centre, Wakaba, holds a symposium once a year (November 22nd in 2018) in Miyazaki City. The main aim is to share knowledge about comprehensive support for school refusal, truancy, Hikikomori, and youth delinquency. Anyone with an interest in these issues can attend the symposium without charge. To find out more about the symposium, please contact Naoki Maeda; naoki225@phoenix.ac.jp (Language: Japanese)

Earlier activities and achievements

  • In October of 2018 Dr. Masahiko Ono (Meijigakuin University) provided a workshop entitled “Comprehensive support for school nonattendance youth with/without developmental disorders to be able to adapt to the school environment” for cognitive behavioural professionals at the 44th Japanese Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Contact: onom@psy.meijigakuin.ac.jp
  • In 2017 Dr. Shinichi Ishikawa (Doshisha University) provided a lecture entitled “School-based cognitive behavioural therapy for youths” in Wakayama. Contact: ishinn@mail.doshisha.ac.jp
  • In 2017 Dr. Shinichi Ishikawa (Doshisha University) provided a lecture entitled “Psychosocial approach to youth with anxiety disorders: The practice of cognitive behavioural approach” to school teachers in Shiga. Contact: ishinn@mail.doshisha.ac.jp
  • In November of 2017, the youth support consultation centre (Wakaba) in Miyazaki city provided a lecture and panel discussion about school refusal and Hikikomori. There were 150 participants who were teachers, parents of school refusers and Hikikomori, police, public employees, and journalists. Contact: Naoki Maeda. naoki225@phoenix.ac.jp

Helpful links and other resources

  • Ishikawa S., Muto, T., & Sato, S. (2018) have prepared a Japanese translation of: Mennuti, R. B., Christner, R. W., & Freeman, A. (2012). Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions in Educational Settings: A Handbook for Practice (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge. The publisher is Kongo-shuppan (Tokyo). Contact: ishinn@mail.doshisha.ac.jp
  • Maeda, N. (2017). School refusal after the summer holiday: School-based behavioural approach for school refusal. Kyoiku to Igaku (Education and Medicine), 65, 812-820. (in Japanese). Contact: naoki225@phoenix.ac.jp
  • Ono, M. (2017). Comprehensive support, shaping, and maintaining school attending behavior despite difficulty in changing conditions at the school: Junior high school student with prolonged school non-attendance. The Japanese Journal of Special Education, 55, 37-46. (in Japanese). Contact: onom@psy.meijigakuin.ac.jp
  • Dr. Ishikawa (Doshisha University) is one of the translators of the Japanese version of “When Children Refuse School: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Approach Parent Workbook”, authored by Kearney, C. A., & Albano, A. M. (2007). Other translators were Y. Sato and H. Sato. The book is published by Iwasaki-gakujyutu-sshuppan (Tokyo). Contact: ishinn@mail.doshisha.ac.jp
  • Kawai, I., & Sakurai, K. (2000). School Refusal: Support for School Return (Futokou: Saitoko no shien). Nakanishiya-shuppan. (in Japanese). This book was introduced on the website of LIB Psychoeducation Research Institution. http://libshinri.sunnyday.jp/counselor.html

To contribute information that may be of interest to others in your country, please contact your country’s host: Naoki Maeda (naoki225@phoenix.ac.jp). As the International Network for School Attendance grows, materials will be added to your country’s webpage. Currently, this webpage is updated every three months.

Disclaimer: INSA’s Mission encourages us to disseminate as much readily available information as possible, without judgement. The sharing of this information should not be seen as an endorsement by INSA. Please access and use the information with proper judgement.

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